There is such great satisfaction finishing a coloring page. The time creating it is counted as a joy, but there is another thing that makes it even more joyful and satisfactory, sharing it. I feel just like a little kid, “Mommy, see what I made!” resounds in my mind as I complete the cycle…sharing my finished masterpiece with someone else.

However, oft-times I find myself in solitude at that triumphant moment.  What to do?  What to do?

I do color with a weekly coloring group in my community, and we enjoy sharing our finished pieces, but if you are searching for instant gratification in the glow of completing your work of art and if you want a sympathetic and accepting, even (dare I say) enthusiastic audience, then coloring groups online are a good place to go.

Within these groups enthusiastic colorists gladly share their own art with their online coloring buddies.  Comments and encouragement flow back and forth as well as tips and tricks for improving your coloring skills, where to find discount on cool coloring accouterments and the stories behind the pieces make this a rich and enjoyable environment for getting a thumbs up for your efforts.

Don’t be intimidated by those colorists who seem to create breath-taking pieces.  All skill levels are acceptable.  These groups often are made up of thousands of coloring enthusiasts and the reach is worldwide.

Some tips for these groups.

  • Each group has it’s own rules or guidelines.  Be sure to read them and understand them before you post.
  • Before you post, start by reading the posts for the last few days.  It will give you an idea of the personality of that group.
  • Always give credit to the author of the page you are showing off.
  • It lends interest to your post when you mention the media you used to create your finished work, such as:  “I chose to use my Prisma set of coloring pencils.” or “I am using glitter pens to get that effect on the unicorn’s horn.” etc.
  • If you want to get enthusiastic comments and suggestions on your posts, be sure to reciprocate.  More people will be interested in your work, if you take the time and courtesy to comment on theirs.
  • If you can’t say anything nice about a post, don’t say anything at all.  Good advice from a cute little bunny and this holds true for coloring groups.  (Or any forum you may be a member of.)  Just skip over the posts you don’t agree with or you can’t find anything good to say about.  Drama, bickering and unkindness is frowned upon in these groups and has a tendency to get you banned.
  • Don’t spam the group with several posts a day.  It isn’t nice to hog the limelight.  As we all learned in kindergarten, take your turn.
  • If you are a coloring book author, limit yourself to mentions of your books or pages to a few per week (see the group guidelines about this as every group is different).

Here is a list of some of the groups I can personally recommend.  (Please tell them that Peaceful Patterns sent you, wink wink.)

Any or all of these groups should give you hours of sharing your creations with fellow colorists and encourage you in your coloring therapy to continue to enjoy your peaceful coloring journey.

 

Coloring clubs and meetups are springing up all over the country. Men and women from late teens to elderly are gathering with fellow colorists to color, compare favorite coloring books and pages and get some great face time with real people who love coloring as much as they do.

These groups tend to start small and grow quickly as attendees ask friends to join them. Before you know it, you have a great social group coloring and chatting together. It’s a great way to make new friends and learn new coloring techniques or find out about new ways of coloring or see how other people organize their coloring supplies.

I just started a coloring club here in the Tri-Cities, Washington. We just had our first meeting last week. It was small, but very congenial and one member said she is bringing her grandmother this week (today), so I am assuming everying had as good a time as I did.

So what is the point of this thing that is sweeping the country? Actually, it reminds me of the old time quilting bees where everyone sat around a quilting frame, working on a beautiful hand made quilt. As their needles flashed in the rhythmic and soothing stitching, the ladies talked and chatted, sometimes as a group and sometimes in little side conversations. It was a great way to get to know one another and stay in touch (long before social media) and ultimately everyone usually went home feeling the better for it.

Are any of my readers going to coloring clubs? In my next blog we will talk about coloring groups online. See you then.